Report by Madi S. Njie

“The cultural and creative industries generate annual global revenues of US$2,250 billion and exports of over US$250 billion.

“These sectors, which currently provide nearly 30 million jobs worldwide and employ more people aged 15−29 than any other sector, can even make up to 10% of GDP in some countries. The creative economy, constituted by these sectors, has thus become a major driver of development and trade strategies in developed and developing countries alike,said the Ojoma Ochai- Director Programme at the British Council in the UK.

Ms Ochai was the lead presenter at the workshop on media and civil society engagement on the local content on Gambia Quadrennial Periodic Report (QPR), held at the Tourism and Hospitality Institute (GTHI) in Kanifing.

On 11 July 2019, the National Council for Arts and Culture (NCAC) hosted an intensive training workshop for members of the print and electronic media in The Gambia, writers associations, artists’ unions, cultural groups, broadcasters on the follow-ups to the UNESCO 2005 Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions.

After 8 years The Gambia in 2013 ratified the UNESCO 2005 Convention on the promotion and protection of Diversity of Cultural Expression, recognising the sovereign right of governments to adopt public policies and preferential treatment measures, that nurture creativity, provide access for artists to domestic and international markets and ensure their works are accessible.

As part of the follow-ups to the Convention -‘Investing in Creativity’ The Gambia Quadrennial Periodic Report (QPR) Information and National Team Workshop was held, as part of initial similar events.

Below is an excerpt in Italics of Ms Ochai presentation at a seminar, Chaired by Mr Hassoum Ceeay- NCAC Director General, supported by NCAC staff- who also  Presented on the updates of the Copy Right Act of the Gambia:

“Over the past two decades, the cultural and creative industries have evolved dramatically. This is particularly the case in developing countries, where there is a deep reliance on informal cultural systems, processes and institutions that may leave many artists and cultural professionals beyond the reach of governance, regulation and investment opportunities.

Such developments challenge the sovereignty of nations and their ability to design and implement public policies to promote their domestic cultural and creative industries.

Commenting on the UNESCO 2005 Convention’s Four Goals, British Council’s Ochai states:

“The guiding principles and values that underpin the Convention are: first: to ensure that ‘the sovereign right of States to adopt and implement policies to promote the diversity of cultural expressions that are based on informed, transparent and participatory processes and systems of governance;’

Second: To ensure the equitable access, openness and balance in the flow of cultural goods and services, as well as the free movement of artists and cultural professionals;’

Thirdly:  Ensure the recognition of the complementary economic and cultural aspects of sustainable development;’ and

Fourthly: To ensure the respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms of expression, information and communication, as a pre-requisite for the creation, distribution and enjoyment of diverse cultural expressions.

Article 9 of the QPR – Information sharing and transparency, requires State Parties to provide appropriate information in their reports to UNESCO every four years on measures taken to promote the diversity of cultural expressions within their territory and at the international level;

(b) Designate a point of contact responsible for information sharing in relation to this Convention;

(c) Share and exchange information relating to the diversity of cultural expressions.

The QPR Process:

In order to monitor the impact of the Convention over time a monitoring framework was elaborated in 2015.

This framework illustrates the different policy areas covered by the Convention and offers a road map for the monitoring of policies and measures implemented to achieve the Goals of the Convention.

The indicators and means of verification are expected to apply both at the national level and in the international arena; indeed, much of the success in implementation will depend on the strength of interaction between the two levels.

Moreover, the monitoring framework offers new insights for monitoring how the implementation of the Convention can contribute to the realization of targeted SDGs Links with SDGs.

The implementation of the monitoring framework, notably through the elaboration of the national QPRs, allows to address the following key questions:

1- Has the Convention induced or inspired policy change at the country level, in the form of new or amendments to current policy provisions and measures to protect and promote the diversity of cultural expressions?

2- How effectively are these policies and measures being implemented?

3- Have these policies and measures created better outcomes in terms of human development?

Monitoring Framework:

In order to monitor the impact of the Convention over time a monitoring framework was elaborated in 2015.

This framework illustrates the different policy areas covered by the Convention and offers a road map for the monitoring of policies and measures implemented to achieve the Goals of the Convention

The indicators and means of verification are expected to apply both at the national level and in the international arena; indeed, much of the success in implementation will depend on the strength of interaction between the two levels.

Moreover, the monitoring framework offers new insights for monitoring how the implementation of the Convention can contribute to the realization of targeted SDGs Links with SDGs.

The implementation of the monitoring framework, notably through the elaboration of the national QPRs, allows to address the following key questions:

1- Has the Convention induced or inspired policy change at the country level, in the form of new or amendments to current policy provisions and measures to protect and promote the diversity of cultural expressions?

2- How effectively are these policies and measures being implemented?

4- Have these policies and measures created better outcomes in terms of human development?

QPR Reporting:

Periodic reporting supports, through multi stakeholder dialogues, evidence-based policymaking and strengthens democratic processes:

The implementation of the monitoring framework takes place notably through the elaboration of the national Quadrennial periodic reports (QPRs), a statutory obligation of all Parties to the Convention.

Indeed, Parties have committed, according to articles 9 and 19, to collect and share information and data, statistics and good practices on policies and measures that protect and promote the diversity of cultural expressions in their respective country.

QPRs allow us to address the following key questions:

1-  What is the state of the art in the process of implementation of the Convention?

2 – Which policy changes have take place during the last 4 years to protect and promote the diversity of cultural expressions? Whit what impacts? Have they created better outcomes in terms of human development?

3-  What emerging policy areas need further investment according to the national context in terms of policy intervention?

Policy-making is a cyclical process. Monitoring and reporting constitute a key step within this policy cycle, helping countries to grasp the state of affairs of their creative sector and understand/define priority actions for the future.

The reporting process goes well beyond a technical exercise; it is designed to build a platform for sustained policy dialogue between government and civil society actors and actively supports, through multi‐stakeholder dialogues, innovative, forward‐looking and evidence‐based cultural policy making….”

Ends

Disclaimer: Views expressed in this section are the author's own and do not represent the editorial policy of Kairo News. Kairo News will trash any comment that inflames tribal, racial or religious hatred.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: